Stop Jordan Cove LNG & the Pacific Connector Pipeline

Stop Jordan Cove LNG & the Pacific Connector Pipeline

A Canadian fossil fuel corporation, Pembina, wants to build the Jordan Cove Energy Project to export fracked liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Canada and the Rockies through southern Oregon to Coos Bay and then to Asia. This would require the 229-mile Pacific Connector fracked gas pipeline across private and public land, creating a permanentclearcut through southwest Oregon’s forests, farms and rivers.

The pipeline would terminate in an export facility in southern Oregon on the North Spit in the Port of Coos Bay. This facility would be located in the tsunami hazard zone, placing thousands of people in the hazardous ...

A Canadian fossil fuel corporation, Pembina, wants to build the Jordan Cove Energy Project to export fracked liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Canada and the Rockies through southern Oregon to Coos Bay and then to Asia. This would require the 229-mile Pacific Connector fracked gas pipeline across private and public land, creating a permanentclearcut through southwest Oregon’s forests, farms and rivers.

The pipeline would terminate in an export facility in southern Oregon on the North Spit in the Port of Coos Bay. This facility would be located in the tsunami hazard zone, placing thousands of people in the hazardous burn zone in the case of an accident. This project would pollute more than 400 waterways and harm salmon, impact hundreds of landowners, threaten tribal territories and burial grounds, raise energy prices, and create the largest source of climate pollution in Oregon.

The project faces opposition from a broad coalition that includes landowners, existing small businesses that would be impacted, tribes, health professionals, climate action and water quality advocates, and more.

The state of Oregon has a critical decision-making role for the project. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality already denied an important permit needed for the project to move forward based on potential impacts to clean water. Right now, the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) is reviewing the project to determine whether it is consistent with state requirements to protect coastal resources.

Take action today by telling the Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) to deny the Coastal Zone Management Act Certification for this project. Oregon needs to transition to clean energy that can create jobs and protect our quality of life, not develop the first fracked gas export terminal on the West Coast.

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Tell FERC: Stop Jordan Cove LNG

Will you help stop the Jordan Cove LNG project by sending a comment to FERC today?

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is asking for public comment on the twice-denied Jordan Cove Liquefied Natural Gas Export Terminal and Pacific Connector Pipeline proposed in southern Oregon.

Because of overwhelming public comment the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has already said "NO" to this project, now it's time to ask FERC to deny this project for a third and final time.

Dear The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission,

Comment Re: Public Comment on the Jordan Cove Energy Project (CP17-494-000 and CP17-495-000)

I strongly oppose the Jordan Cove Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and Pacific Connector Pipeline project (CP17-494-000 and CP17-495-000). FERC should not issue Authorization and Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity because the adverse environmental, public safety, and other impacts of these projects demonstrate that the projects are contrary to the public interest. Additionally, the DEIS fails to support its conclusions that the projects would have only some limited adverse environmental impacts. FERC therefore cannot proceed without revising its analysis and any revised analysis must be made available for further public comment prior to any FERC decision to grant the pending application. My specific concerns include:


1) Farms, fishing, and recreation businesses will suffer as the project impacts nearly 500 waterways damaging sensitive salmon and steelhead habitat, and hurting existing jobs and businesses.
 The drinking water supplies for more than 150,000 Oregonian’s could be contaminated by the chemicals used during construction of the pipeline.

2) The export terminal and increased fracking would make climate change worse. The terminal alone would become the largest climate polluter in Oregon by 2020.

3) Traditional tribal territories, cultural resources, and burial grounds are threatened by the pipeline. The Klamath, Siletz, Karuk, Yurok, and Tolowa Dee-ni' Tribes have all come out in strong opposition to the pipeline.

4) Farmer and landowner rights will be trampled. Hundreds of private landowners will be impacted along the pipeline route and many will be threatened with eminent domain if they do not settle for permanent use of their land. 


5) Fracked gas is explosive and the terminal would be located in a tsunami zone. The pipeline would be located in wildfire-prone areas and over 16,000 people near the terminal would be in a “Hazardous Burn Zone.”

I strongly oppose this project and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission should deny with prejudice the Authorization and the Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.

Sincerely,